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West Virginia 4-H

For more than 100 years, 4-H has helped Mountain State youth find their future.

Join the West Virginia 4-H tradition

From science-based learning to historical lessons, 4-H cultivates tomorrow's leaders and offers comprehensive growth for the whole family.

two young girls and one boy looking at a jar with bugs and grass inside

Join

West Virginia 4-H is a free, educational program for West Virginia youth in all 55 counties.

What is 4-H?
Chartering
4-H Volunteer

4-H Volunteers

Our program offers volunteer opportunities for youths, adolescents and adults.

Required Volunteer Training
Extension Camping Instructors
STEM Ambassadors
Volunteer Leaders' Weekend Conference

Upcoming Events

Recent News

Buy Tickets for 4-H Football Day 2019

Stripe the stadium event at WVU football game

All 4-H members, parents, volunteers, supporters, alumni, family and friends are invited to Mountaineer Field on Saturday, October 12 for the annual 4-H Football Day to watch the Mountaineers take on the Iowa State Cyclones.

4-H participants will receive discounted tickets along with group seating to experience the excitement together. After purchasing, a confirmation email will be sent with a referral link to share with family and friends. Anyone that purchases from that referral link will automatically be seated next to you.

Read Buy Tickets for 4-H Football Day 2019

West Virginia 4-H youth experience Eastern Woodland Indian traditions

Young camper talking to Native American cultural expert in traditional headdress

Through a partnership with West Virginia University’s Native American Studies Program, West Virginia 4-H campers learned about Eastern Woodland Indians, the first people to inhabit what is today the Mountain State. With the state's American Indian/Alaska Native population estimated at less than 1%, West Virginia youth have few opportunities to learn directly from Native American educators. Campers in Braxton, Cabell, Kanawha, Mason, Roane and Wayne counties experienced the history, communities, agricultural practices and other traditional aspects about the earliest residents of the region from an Native American Eastern Woodland cultural expert.

This project was presented with financial support from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Read West Virginia 4-H youth experience Eastern Woodland Indian traditions